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Join us and the Tonic Artspace as we venture into new unknown territory like youtube
 
 
 


June - July 2014
 
 "Grand Royale" a celebratory showcase of contemporary East End artists opens the season of art for the Jackson Carriage House. Carly Haffner's diverse curating is an inviting array of rich works from local artists who continue to pulsate within the community.
 
 
grand royale

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 June 2014

 

 

 

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 Check out Grant Haffner's Painting "Twenty Seven East"in the June 2014 issue of HC&G

 

 

 


 Available now

 

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 "Head of Pond Road" by Grant Haffner

Limited edition prints are now available through 

SebatianFoster.com

 

 


April 2014

 

corner

"Corner of Main Street Bridgehampton" 

by Grant Haffner

 

Wu Woo Volume 3

CORNERS 

 

 


 

 February - March 2014

 

The Tonic Artspace presents:

phenomena

 

To Show, Shine, appear,

to be manifest seemingly of itself,

plural phenomena,

is any observable occurrence, an extraordinary event.

 

The Tonic Artspace Pop-Up Gallery returned to Kathryn Markel's 2418 Main Street Bridgehampton gallery for the months of February and March and celebrated new artworks by Arrex, Maeve D’Arcy, Carly Haffner, Christine Lidrbauch, Scott Gibbons, and Grant Haffner.

 

 

 philip c haffner

 

*A portrait of Philip Clark Haffner, painted in 1974 by the San Francisco artist Lori Weiss, will also be on view as a memorial in celebration of his life.  Phil left this world peacefully on February 6th, 2014, but his passionate and creative spirit will never leave us.


arrex
 

ARREX

The Rx project stems from my brush with death when in the span of 2 years, 5 members of my family were diagnosed with cancer, or other severe ailments. During this time I was surprised with a tumor of my very own. Needless to say, I became fascinated with medicine and the artistic theme of “Memento Mori”. In Latin, this means “Remember Death”. My skulls serve as a small reminder of our mortality and the fragility that is life. The fun I have with them reflects that while life is serious business...it should also be fun. My skulls are all created from one base photograph I took in London over 7 years ago. This is why they all have a unified branding to them. I’ve been screen-printing and hand cutting skull and teeth stickers in my small studio tirelessly for the past four years.

 

 
maeve
 

MAEVE D’ARCY

Maeve D'Arcy is a visual artist born in Queens, New York. She recently attended a month long residency at the Contemporary Artists Center in Troy, NY.  In 2013 she graduated from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London with an MA in Fine Art. In 2009 she graduated summa cum laude from the CUNY Baccalaureate Program for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies with a major in Visual Art and Social Justice Studies. She is based in New York City as well as in London and Ireland, and her practice is focused on painting, drawing, and sculpture.

 

 

carly haffner

 

CARLY HAFFNER

Carly Haffner grew up in Springs, NY.  She attended California College of Arts and Crafts (B.F.A.) in San Francisco, CA and Hunter College (M.F.A.) in New York City.  In 2005 she co-founded a local art collective called Bonac Tonic.  Carly has shown her art at Silas Marder Gallery, Mosquito Hawk Gallery, Werkstatte in New York City, Park Life in San Francisco, and ADA Gallery in Richmond, VA.

 

 

 scott gibbons

 

SCOTT GIBBONS

Scott Gibbons currently resides in East Hampton, NY, but his heart and mind really resides in the world of the soft sculpture creatures and worlds he constructs. To put it simply, he is a creator of worlds unbeknown to conventional art circles in that he manipulates textiles to his bidding in order to convey his cartoonish and childlike whims. From small Bubbie Monsters to framed scenes to large scale installations, Scott forms his own universe by using his best asset, his incomparable imagination.

 

 

lidrbauch

 

CHRISTINE LIDRBAUCH

Christine Lidrbauch is an artist who uses many different media to communicate a melding of male and female cultures.  Sculptures are made using discarded plastic auto bumpers, recombining them to make new forms, focusing on symmetry, which brings to mind the body.  The works are a homage to industrial production and design, speak of recycling and waste in the use of the discarded items, and are often referential to art historical works.

 

 

g.haffner

 

GRANT HAFFNER

Born in 1978 Berkeley, California and raised in East Hampton, Long Island.  When I drive I feel completely alive.  For a small moment, in between this place and that, I am free from reality.  My truck and I become a motion of blurred color, barreling through space and time.  I like to keep my window open to listen to the sounds that traveling makes, to enjoy the smell of the landscape.  Every trip is a new one, not one sunset is the same.  On the road I am a part of the painting.  I am movement, color, sound, adventure and emotions. This is my landscape.

 

Please visit the Tonic Artspace Facebook page for event information

 
 
 
The Tonic Artspace Presents: Phenomena

 

Christine Lidrbauch. Courtesy of Tonic Artspace.

Christine Lidrbauch. Courtesy of Tonic Artspace.

By Tessa Raebeck

From remembrances of death and celebrations of love, industrial sculptures to cartoonish monsters, the crisp lines of houses to the blurred hues of sunsets, “Phenomena” is showcasing the variety of talent on the East End through the works of six emerging artists.

“Phenomena,” which opened on Saturday at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts in Bridgehampton, is the latest installation from the Tonic Artspace.

Springs-raised Grant Haffner and his twin sister Carly Haffner are the co-founders of the Bonac Tonic Art Collective, a group established in 2005 for young, local artists on the East End. The Tonic Artspace, Mr. Haffner said, “is the next phase in the collective’s metamorphosis to hopefully more pop-up gallery type situations.”

Print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

Print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

“An undefined, forever evolving, pop-up art promoting machine that understands no boundaries,” the Tonic Artspace’s show features the work of both Haffners, Arrex, Scott Gibbons, Christine Lidrbauch and Maeve D’Arcy.

Mr. Haffner, who has grown steadily in popularity since emerging on the East End art scene, has several pieces in the show, including a print of a colorful sunset, vibrant with oranges, reds, pinks and yellows, with a two-lane road stretching into the abyss beneath it. The scene is recognizably on the East End, although the exact location is unknown—and perhaps unnecessary. When looking at the painting, it is as if the viewer is looking out the dashboard of their car or truck, driving through the colors and into the horizon.

“When I drive I feel completely alive,” writes Mr. Haffner. “For a small moment, in between this place and that, I am free from reality. My truck and I become a motion of blurred color, barreling through space and time. I like to keep my window open to listen to the sounds that traveling makes, to enjoy the smell of the landscape. Every trip is a new one, not one sunset is the same. On the road I am a part of the painting. I am movement, color, sound, adventure and emotions. This is my landscape.”

Carly Haffner has shown her work in New York City, San Francisco and Richmond, Virginia. In one painting, a tree in the foreground has a date and heart carved into it, allowing the viewer to devise their own story of what “Nov. 4th 1993” means. A house stands alone in the background, perhaps owned by the couple who carved the heart, perhaps unrelated. The apparent simplicity of her paintings gives them depth, sending the viewer’s eyes in multiple directions with tree shadows that aren’t quite natural and colored leaves that aren’t quite formed.

The Haffners’ creativity can be traced back to their father, Phil, who passed away February 6. “His passionate and creative spirit will never leave us,” the collective wrote in a press release issued to announce the show’s opening. A 1974 portrait of Phil Haffner completed by San Francisco artist Lori Weiss is displayed in his honor as a part of the show.

Color print by Arrex. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

Colored Parking Sign by Arrex. 

A core artist of the collective, Scott Gibbons of East Hampton is also showing in “Phenomena.” Gibbons’ art comes from the worlds he creates in his own head, which are filled with interesting creatures and strange characters of his imagination that he materializes through sculpture. “To put it simply, he is a creator of worlds unbeknown to conventional art circles in that he manipulates textiles to his bidding in order to convey his cartoonish and childlike whims,” the press release announcing the show stated.

Artist Christine Lidrbauch often uses found materials and discarded items to show the “melding of male and female cultures.” In one piece, a viewer far away sees a simple red and yellow flower against a pretty pink backdrop. Upon closer examination, they find the lines of the petals are in fact missiles.

Maeve D’Arcy, a visual artist from Queens, works on social justice and visual art simultaneously, with her focus on painting, drawing and sculpture. “The patterns accumulate into an urban/rural map of abstract geometric porous land masses and aerial views of real and imagined spaces,” she says.

Arrex, “a very cool up and coming street artist to keep your eyes on,” according to Mr. Haffner, created his work in the show after dealing with multiple deaths in his family and discovering that he had a tumor.

Skulls, from the same base photograph, adorn his color prints in the street art style of overlapping figures, strong black lines and mixed images. “My skulls serve as a small reminder of our mortality and the fragility that is life,” said Arrex. “The fun I have with them reflects that while life is serious business … it should also be fun.”

 

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 Events from 2013:
 
 
 
 
 

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The organizers (Hampton Photo Arts +Tonic) of this juried exhibition and art contest asked youth artists to submit work in any medium for a show at Ashawagh Hall in Springs. Submissions were grouped by grade/age divisions and work was entered into two categories: Photography/Digital Art/Mixed (graphic) Media or Drawing/Painting/Illustration/Collage/Sculpture. Prizes were awarded for Best in Show and Best in Division/Category.   The Tonic Artspace built a cave out of cardboard boxes.

 

 

The Bonac Cave Systems
event photos taken by Robert D. Comes

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Just for some extra fun check out this video call for entries, starring local artist, Dan’s Papers cover artist and event organizer Grant Haffner (of Tonic Artspace).


 

 

 

Tonic Artspace Bridgehampton 2013:

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The most notorious case of graffiti in Hamptons history was one that spawned a local legend. 

About 40 years ago, ''Virgil Is the Frog Boy'' appeared on a trestle spanning the Sag Harbor Turnpike. Though weathered, the words were visible for many years after. Lore has it an East Hampton teenager was so named by his friends, but his identity and the circumstances under which he earned the nickname remain a secret.

Some years later, ''Virgil Is Still the Frog Boy'' appeared on the same trestle. Speculation about the mystery flared anew, but that case has never been solved.

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Tonic Artspace bridgehampton 

Celebrating brand new artworks by: 

Carly Haffner

Christine Lidrbauch

Grant Haffner

Scott Blueborn

Scott Gibbons

  




 
 
 

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Check out Grant Haffner's painting "Winter on Long Beach" on the cover of Dan's Papers

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